Video anchor 5.MAR.2020 4 MIN READ | 4 MIN READ
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What are allergy shots and allergy drops?

Allergies result from an over-reactive response by our immune system to typically harmless environmental substances. Common respiratory allergies include allergic rhinoconjunctivitis where symptoms include frequent runny nose, blocked nose, itchy nose and eyes, watery eyes and sneezing and asthma which may present with recurrent wheezing or chronic cough.

There are 2 treatment options for respiratory allergies – allergy shots and allergy drops. Both treatments are forms of allergen immunotherapy, which involves exposing patients to small doses of what they are allergic to over a period of time to reduce their sensitivity to the allergen.

Allergy shots are also known as subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT), subcutaneous meaning “under the skin”. In SCIT, small doses of the allergen are injected into the skin (usually in the upper arm).

An alternative to allergy shots are allergy drops, which are also known as sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). Sublingual means “under the tongue”, and involves placing allergy drops (in liquid or tablet form) under the tongue.

Allergy shots vs allergy drops: Which should I choose?

While they achieve the same outcome of building immunity to allergens, allergy shots and allergy drops have different benefits and drawbacks. Understanding how both forms of treatment work can help you decide which may be more suitable for your condition.

Comparison Point Allergy Shots Allergy Drops
Targeted Allergies Can be used to treat a wide range of options for treatment for specific seasonal and indoor allergies stemming from exposure to mould, dust mites, pet dander and pollen, as well as insect stings Efficacy is proven for treatment of allergic rhinitis or conjunctivitis caused by allergy to grass, ragweed or dust mites
Administration Each injection must be administered under physician supervision; with monitoring for an additional 30 minutes as severe reactions can occur in rare cases. First dose of allergy drops should be administered under physician supervision. Subsequent drops can be self-administered at home.
Frequency The process is divided into 2 phases: the build-up phase, and the maintenance phase.

During the build-up phase, you may receive injections once to twice a week. Each injection will contain increasing doses of allergens to allow your body to get used to the allergens. This phase can last up to 6 months.

During the next phase – the maintenance phase, injections are less frequent and can be reduced to once or twice a month. This will continue for 3 – 5 years, or until your allergy symptoms improve.
Most allergy drops are taken on a daily basis, or a few times as week, for 3 – 5 years. Treatment length varies based on the type and severity of your allergy.
Effectiveness Both allergy shots and allergy drops have been shown to improve allergy and mild asthma symptoms, reducing the need to take allergy and asthma medicines.
Possible Side Effects
  • Allergy shots are generally safe, and side effects are usually mild.
  • Common side effects include redness or swelling at the injection site. This reaction typically begins immediately or within a few hours of the injection, and will go away after several hours.
  • Less common side effects include the onset of allergy symptoms, such as sneezing, hives and nasal congestion.
  • In rare cases, a severe and life-threatening reaction known as anaphylaxis may occur. This often starts within 30 minutes of the injection, but can sometimes start later.
  • Allergy drops are generally safe, and side effects are usually mild.
  • Studies have shown that patients using allergy drops are at a considerably lower risk of experiencing severe reactions than patients receiving allergy shots.
  • Possible side effects include throat irritation and itching or mild swelling in the mouth.
Suitability for Children and Infants
  • Generally recommended for children 5 years old or older, as younger children may not be able to properly communicate if they are experiencing symptoms of an allergic reaction to allergy shots.
  • Younger children may also be less comfortable with getting injections.
  • Most allergy drops are licensed from age 5 years or older, similar to allergy shots.
  • Younger children may be more accepting of this pain-free treatment.

 

In conclusion, both allergy shots and allergy drops are safe and effective treatment options that reduce your body’s reaction to allergens. While allergy shots target a wider range of allergens as compared to allergy drops, the latter may be a more cost-effective and convenient option as it can be self-administered at home, without you needing to pay your doctor a visit. Allergy drops may also be more suitable for young children or adults who are afraid of needles.

It is important to consult your doctor before starting either forms of treatment. Your doctor will be able to advise you on the recommended type of treatment, as well as the possible cost and duration of treatment based on your specific allergy.

If your child requires a routine health assessment (for growth and development) or vaccinations, you can bring them to Parkway East Paediatric Clinic at the following hours:

Monday – Saturday
8:30am – 10.30am

(The above time slot is strictly for routine health assessments/checks and vaccinations only. Prior booking is recommended.)

For children with other conditions, please visit the clinic at the following timings:

Monday – Friday
10.30am – 1pm
2pm – 4.30pm

Saturday
10.30am – 1pm (closed on Sundays and public holidays)

Infographic reviewed by Dr Mohana Rajakulendran, paediatrician at Parkway East Hospital 

References

Allergy shots. (n.d.). Retrieved 26 November 2019, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/allergy-shots/about/pac-20392876.

Allergy Shots (Immunotherapy): Effectiveness, Side-Effects & Risks. (n.d.). Retrieved 26 November 2019 from https://www.webmd.com/allergies/allergy-shots#1.

Cherney, K. (2017, June 7). Allergy Shots: Side Effects, Efficacy, Cost, and What to Expect. Retrieved 26 November 2019 from https://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/allergy-shots.

James, C., & Bernstein, D. I. (2017, February). Allergen immunotherapy: an updated review of safety. Retrieved 26 November 2019 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5644500/.

John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science. (2013, August 22). Allergy Shots and Allergy Drops for Adults and Children. Retrieved 26 November 2019 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK158927/.

More, D. (2019, September 27). Comparison of Allergy Drops and Allergy Shots. Retrieved 26 November 2019 from https://www.verywellhealth.com/allergy-drops-and-allergy-shots-82685.

Moyer, N. (2019, April 30). Allergy Drops: What to Know About Sublingual Immunotherapy. Retrieved 26 November 2019 from https://www.healthline.com/health/allergy-drops#what-to-expect.

Oykhman, P., Kim, H. L., & Ellis, A. K. (2015, November 10). Allergen immunotherapy in pregnancy. Retrieved 26 November 2019 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4641390/.

Pongdee, T. (n.d.). Allergy Shots (Immunotherapy): AAAAI. Retrieved 26 November 2019 from https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/library/allergy-library/allergy-shots-(immunotherapy).

Seymour, T. (2017, December 24). Allergy shots (immunotherapy): Efficacy, side effects, and types. Retrieved 26 November 2019 from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320402.php.

5.MAR.2020